Tirpitz

The History

The Sortie to Norway

To prevent that Tirpitz was discovered by sailing through Skagerrak, like what happened to Bismarck, it was decided that the battleship should sail through the canal from Kiel to Wilhelmshaven.

Photo: 12 January 1942: Tirpitz left Kiel and sailed through the Kaiser Wilhelm Canal to return to Wilhelmshaven.

Tirpitz left Kiel on 12 January 1942, heading for Wilhelmshaven. On her way she made a short hold at Holtenau and Brunsbüttel.

Photo: 16 January 1942: Tirpitz arrives off Trondheim.

Berth of Tirpitz in Fættenfjord

14 January 1942 Tirpitz, escorted by the destroyers Richard Beitzen, Paul Jacobi, Bruno Heinemann and Z29, transferred from Wilhelmshaven, Germany to Trondheim, Norway. It was 4 days later than originally planned. Tirpitz arrived, together with the destroyers, at Trondheim in Norway and anchored in Fættenfjord 16 January 1942.

Photo: 16 January 1942: The battleship noses into her berth at the head of Fættenfjord, an arm of the main Trondheimfjord at some considerable distance from the town.

The first British attempt to attack Tirpitz in Norway took place 30 January 1942 (Operation "Oiled"). 7 Short Stirlings of 15 and 149 squadrons took of from Lossiemouth at 0030 and 8 Halifaxes of 10 and 76 squadrons took of from Lossiemouth between 0204 and 0234. Due to bad weather the aircraft was not able to attack the German battleship.